IB Career-related Programme

IB Career-related Programme Coordinator Message

Exciting news as our newest programme, the IB Career-related Programme, has gone through a curriculum review, resulting in a revision of this programme’s core. This new academic option has been designed for students interested in pursuing a more career-oriented path: “The IBCP incorporates the educational principles, vision and learner profile of the IB into a unique offering that specifically addresses the needs of students who wish to engage in a career-related education.” There are two components to the Career Programme: a rigorous academic course-load studied along with a career-related programme (known here in Nevada as a Career and Technical Education or CTE). These two components are bridged by a set of specially-designed IBCP core requirements, which will allow CP students to access and focus on career related curriculum while at the same time receiving a well-rounded education that is internationally focused. Wooster believes this programme will add options for students to earn another type of IB Diploma.

The IB CP is another great opportunity for our Wooster students who want to study a specific career and experience the rigor and challenges of IB coursework. One of the major advantages that the IBCP offers students is flexibility: it allows students to pursue both, a rigorous and challenging academic programme and gain professional skills. IBCP graduates will be prepared for a wide variety of post-secondary options, including the university, working in the “real world”, and pursuing further professional studies.

We encourage you to learn more about our programme and please contact me if you are interested in learning more about this IB programme.

Send an email

This following website can provide you with additional information about the IBCP:

IBCP Alumni Network

  1. If you are an IBCP student, sign up for the IBCP Alumni Network

  2. Join the IB Alumni Advisory Council

How do the CP and DP compare and contrast? View a comparison chart

Like the Diploma Programme, the IBCP also provides students in grades 11th and 12th with a rigorous academic option.

  • Challenging curriculum, and exciting classes with emphasis on writing, thinking and communicating.
  • Internationally recognized
  • Community involvement through businesses and education partnerships, a commitment students make to become more involved in their community.
  • High standards of teaching required by the IB programme
  • IB education focuses on learners, student-centered
  • Internal and external examination/assessments
  • Possibility of advanced placement in college courses
  • Possibility of academic scholarships
  • A high school experience with extra-curricular activities
  • Classes based on inquiry and research
  • World standards, in addition to local, state and national standards

Programme Requirements

To participate as a Career-related Candidate, the IB student must fulfill the following requirements:

  • Participate in career-related pathway & complete course sequence: CTE (Level I, II, II) or JROTC (Level I, II, III, IV)
  • Participate at least two IB DP courses in any of the subject groups
  • Take IB examinations in his/her IBDP subject areas (each student is responsible for paying an IB registration fee and the cost of exams)
  • Complete all four CP Core components
    • Service learning hours & portfolio (50 hours minimum)
    • Personal and professional skills class (junior and senior year)
    • Language development & portfolio (50 hours minimum)
    • Reflective project

Failing Conditions

A student will NOT receive an IB Career-related Diploma if one or more of the following occur:

IBCP CORE

  • The candidate did not complete Service Learning hours
  • The candidate did not complete Service Learning Portfolio
  • The candidate has not been awarded a grade of at least D for the Reflective Project—Internally and Externally moderated. Any student awarded a grade of E for the reflective project will not be awarded the IBCP
  • The candidate did not earn a passing grade in the Personal or Professional Skills classes.
  • The candidate did not complete Language Development (LD)
  • The candidate did not complete LD Electronic Portfolio (IB moderated)
  • The candidate has not been awarded a grade 3 or more in at least two of the DP courses registered for the IBCP. (Internal Assessment and External Assessment)
  • The final award committee has judged the candidate to be guilty of malpractice.

WCSD Graduation Requirements

  • The candidate did not meet all WCSD graduation requirements

Signature Academy & CTE Assessments

  • The candidate did not pass Workplace Readiness Skills Assessment (end of CTE course sequence)
  • The candidate did not pass End-of-Programme Technical Assessment (at the end of programme course sequence: L3)
  • The candidate did not achieve at least a .0 grade point average in the CTE course sequence (not cumulative GPA)

JROTC Programme of Accreditation

  • Pass Battalion Staff Inspections & Company In-Rank Inspections
  • Pass Continuous Improvement programme and Service Learning Briefings
  • Complete Cadet Portfolio Interviews and Inspections
  • Pass Drill and Ceremony Inspections & Color Guard Inspections
  • Pass end of semester exams for each Leadership Education Training Level
  • Pass seven semesters of JROTC

Award of the IBCP Diploma: Download chart

International Baccalaureate Career-related Programme logoThe International Baccalaureate (IB) Career-related Programme (CP) is a three-part educational framework.

It consists of:

  • Courses from the IB’s Diploma Programme(DP)
  • The CP Core
  • Career-related studies: The IBCP framework begins in the 11th grade (prerequisites for the programme are taken in the 9th and 10th grades) and allows students to focus on a career-related pathway (CTE or JROTC).

    All CTE/IBCP students must complete all sequence course in their chosen CTE strand (L1, LII, & LIII). Students enroll in their first CTE course level 1, their sophomore year. All IBCP students must complete CTE course sequence: 6 semesters (Energy Technology, Entrepreneurship, Human Development, and Photography)

    CTE Programmes (under IBCP) At WHS Course Description (retrieved from WCSD Master Course Catalog & Course Cataloge Change Notice) *Levels I, II & II minimum requirement
    Entrepreneurship Principles of Business and Marketing
    • Prerequisite: None
    • Level: L1
    • Credits: 1
    • CIP Code: 52.0101

    This course is an entry-level course in the Business Management, Entrepreneurship, Marketing, and Sports & Entertainment Marketing programmes that develops student understanding and skill in areas such as business law, communications, customer relations, economics, information management, marketing, and operations. Students acquire knowledge of fundamental business and marketing activities, factors affecting business, develop verbal and written communications skill, and participate in career exploration and planning.

    *Entrepreneurship I
    • Prerequisite: Principles of Business and Marketing
    • Level: L2 (I credit)
    • CIP Code: 52.0701

    This course is a continuation of the Entrepreneurship programme. Students will gain knowledge in the nature and scope of entrepreneurship, the impact of entrepreneurship on market economies, marketing functions and economic concepts related to entrepreneurship. Personal traits and behaviors of a successful entrepreneur are also examined. The appropriate use of technology and industry-standard equipment is an integral part of this course.

    Entrepreneurship II
    • Prerequisite: Entrepreneurship I
    • Level: L3C (I credit)
    • CIP Code: 52.0701

    This course is a continuation of the Entrepreneurship programme. Students will expand their knowledge of the nature and scope of entrepreneurship, the impact of entrepreneurship on market economies, marketing functions and economic concepts related to entrepreneurship. Business plan development is the key tool by which students will learn concepts. The appropriate use of technology and industry-standard equipment is an integral part of this course. Upon successful completion of this course, students will have acquired entry-level skills for employment and be prepared for post-secondary education.

    Energy Technologies Energy Technologies I
    • Level: L1 (I credit)
    • CIP Code: 15.0503
    • Prerequisite: None

    This course introduces students to the power industry. Students will gain an understanding of safety procedures, equipment, tools, basic electricity principles, and the various energy sources. Students will also explore environmental impacts and availability of energy resources. Students will be introduced to career opportunities and necessary job skills.

    Energy Technologies II
    • Level: L2 (I credit)
    • CIP Code: 15.0503
    • Prerequisite: Energy Technologies I

    This course is a continuation of Energy Technologies I. This course provides intermediate energy technologies students with instruction in energy forms, energy principles, efficiency concepts, building systems, and policies. Students will engage in the use and development of energy conversion systems. The appropriate use of technology and industry standard equipment is an integral part of this course.

    Energy Technologies III
    • Level L3C (I credit)
    • CIP Code: 15.0503
    • Prerequisite: Energy Technologies II

    This course is a continuation of Energy Technologies II. This course provides advanced energy technologies students with instruction in advanced techniques and processes. Areas of emphasis include solar energy, wind energy, and geothermal energy resources. The appropriate use of technology and industry-standard equipment is an integral part of this course. Upon successful completion of this course, students will have acquired entry-level skills for employment and be prepared for post-secondary education.

    Human Development Human Development I
    • Level I (1 credit)
    • CIP Code: 19.0701
    • Prerequisite: None

    This course introduces the topic of Human Development. Areas of study include the stages of human growth and development throughout the lifespan with a focus on conception through childhood. Topics include developmental stages and influences on physical, intellectual, social and emotional growth.

    *Human Development II
    • Level 2 (1 credit)
    • CIP Code: 19.0701
    • Prerequisite: Human Development I

    This course is a continuation of Human Development I. This course allows intermediate human development students to increase their understanding of human growth and development throughout the lifespan with a focus on adolescence through young adulthood. Topics include developmental stages and influences on physical, intellectual, social and emotional growth.

    *Human Development II
    • L3C (1 credit)
    • CIP Code: 19.071
    • Prerequisite: Human Development II

    This course is a continuation of Human Development II. This course allows advanced human development students to increase their understanding of human growth and development throughout the lifespan with a focus on middle adulthood through late adulthood. Topics include developmental stages and influences on physical, intellectual, social and emotional growth. Upon successful completion of this course, students will have acquired entry-level skills for employment and be prepared for post-secondary education.

    Photography Photography I
    • L1 (1 credit)
    • CIP Code 50.0406
    • Prerequisite: None

    This course is designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of commercial photography in relation to seeing photographically, operating cameras, use of light, image capture, and processing digital images. Students will also learn the history of photography, legal and ethical issues related to the industry. Career exploration is also a part of this course.

    Photography II
    • L2 (1 credit)
    • CIP Code 50.0406
    • Prerequisite: Photography I

    This course is a continuation of Photography I. This course provides intermediate photography students with instruction in advanced digital techniques and processes. Areas of study include operating cameras, use of light, image capture, and processing digital images. Students will also learn the history of photography, legal and ethical issues related to the industry. The appropriate use of technology and industry-standard equipment is an integral part of this course.

    Photography III
    • L3 (1 credit)
    • CIP Code 50.0406
    • Prerequisite: Photography II

    This course is a continuation of Photography II. This course provides advanced photography students with instruction in advanced digital techniques and processes in commercial photography. Manipulation of images using industry-standard software is also included. Students will be required to exhibit their projects. Students will be prepared for industry certifications. The appropriate use of technology and industry-standard equipment is an integral part of this course. Upon successful completion of this course, students will have acquired entry-level skills for employment and be prepared for post-secondary education.

    All JROTC/IBCP students must complete JROTC sequence course. Students enroll in their first JROTC course level 1 their freshman year. Students who become involved in the HSROTC as part of the IBCP will require to fulfill a minimum of 7 semesters of HSROTC to qualify for the IBCP Diploma.

    JROTC Leadership HSROTC I-II (LEADERSHIP, EDUCATION & TRAINING I) (LET I)
    • Course #: 5411-5412
    • Credit: .5 /Semester
    • Length: Year

    • Grades: 9-12
    • Prerequisite: None
    • Cost: School Dependent

    This is the basic Leadership Education and Training course. The student will learn the foundations of Army JROTC: getting involved, the making of a better citizen, moving up in the JROTC ranks and structure, personal appearance and the uniform, the United States Flag, and American military traditions and customs. Students will also learn basic leadership theory, skills and application, foundations and study skills for success in school, communication skills and conflict resolution. Students will also receive District mandated Sex Health and Responsibility Education (S.H.A.R.E.) during their first year in HSROTC. NOTE, upon successful completion of the 4th semester of HSROTC, the Physical Education requirement for graduation is fulfilled. The student must successfully complete HSJROTC I-II before taking HSROTC III-IV unless prior approved is obtained from their teacher.
    HSROTC III-IV (LEADERSHIP, EDUCATION & TRAINING II) (LET II)
    • Course #:5413-5414
    • Credit: .5/Semester
    • Length: Year

    • Grades: 10-12
    • Prerequisite: HSROTC I-II
    • Cost: School Dependent

    Open to all students who have successfully completed HSROTC II. Students will learn middle level leadership theory, skills and application including effective communications skills (both oral and written). Next, students will learn wellness, fitness, first aid, and the use & effects of drugs and alcohol. They will be introduced to map and orientation skills. Also, they will be introduced to citizenship in American history and government; such as learning citizenship skills, conducting small group meetings, representing group sessions; they will also learn the foundations of the American political system, the Constitution, Bill of Rights, and American roles in democracy. The student must successfully complete HSROTC III-IV before moving to HSROTC V-VI, unless prior approved is obtained from their teacher.
    HSROTC V-VI (LEADERSHIP, EDUCATION & TRAINING III) (LET III)
    • Course #: 5415-5416
    • Credit: .5/Semester
    • Length: Year

    • Grades: 11-12
    • Prerequisite: 5414
    • Cost:

    Open to all students who have successfully completed HSROTC IV. The student will learn the basic command and staff principles, upper level leadership theory, skills and application, critical thinking and decision making skills. Also, the students learn advanced communication skills, advanced conflict resolution, career planning, planning skills and social responsibility, and advanced financial planning and management. NOTE, upon successful completion of the 5th semester of HSROTC, the Health requirement for graduation is fulfilled; also, upon successful completion of the 6th semester of HSROTC, a .5 credit of the Arts and Humanities / Career Technology Education (CTE) is fulfilled. The student must successfully complete HSROTC V-VI before taking HSROTC VII-VIII unless prior approved is obtained from their teacher.
    HSROTC VII-VIII Honors (LEADERSHIP, EDUCATION & TRAINING IV) (LET IV)
    • Course #: 5417-5418
    • Credit: .5/Semester
    • Length: Year

    • Grades:12
    • Prerequisite: 5416
    • Cost: $10.00/semester

    Open to all students who have successfully completed HSROTC VI. The student will learn advanced command and staff principles, advanced level leadership theory, skills and application, critical thinking and decision making skills. The student will spend the major portion of the year planning, organizing, and overseeing the execution of their units programmes and activities, in essence, top level management and leadership. The student will act throughout the year as a classroom assistant instructor and will assign, prepare and present selected units of instruction to subordinate classes. Also, students will increase their knowledge in financial management and planning. Finally, fourth year Cadets will lead a Service Learning Project and provide a capstone reflection briefing on their HSROTC experience. NOTE, upon successful completion of the 7th semester of HSROTC, the other .5 credit of the Arts and Humanities / (CTE) is fulfilled, and a student will receive a .5 Honors Credit; and with completion of the 8th semester of HSROTC, a Cadet will receive the other .5 Honors Credit. The student must successfully complete HSROTC VII before taking HSROTC VIII unless prior approved is obtained from their teacher.

Subjects

IB Diploma Programme (DP) courses:

Two DP courses must be studied. The courses can come from any of the six subject areas and can be studied at the higher level or standard level, as well as a combination of the two. It is possible for students to study more than two DP courses. The table below shows the DP courses available at WHS. The courses can be chosen from any hexagon group 1 to 6 and can even come from the same group should the student want to specialize in a particular field of study. IBCP students are highly encouraged to take IB courses related to their particular field of study (CTE strand). The only restriction on course combination with regard to the Diploma Programme courses in the IBCP is that a student is not allowed to do more than one mathematics course from group 5 (Group 5 courses: Math Studies SL (1 year) & Math Studies HL—a 2-year course). IBCP students cannot study the DP core elements of theory of knowledge, creativity, action, services and extended essay.

IB DP Subject Areas Subject Area Description DP Course Offered at WHS
Group 1: Language A English
IB English HL I
IB English HL I

Group 2: Language Acquisition
Spanish
French
Chinese

Spanish SL I
Spanish SL II
Spanish HL
French SL I
French SL II
French HL
SL will be offered year 2015-2016

Group 3: Individuals and Societies History of the Americas (HOA)
IB HOA I
IB HOA II

Group 4: Experimental Sciences
Design Technology
Biology
Chemistry
Physics

IB Design Tech SL
IB Biology SL
IB Biology HL
IB Chemistry SL
IB Chemistry HL
IB Physics SL

Group 5: Mathematics Mathematics
Math SL I
Math HL I
Math HL II

Group 6: The Arts
IB Music
Theatre
Visual Arts

IB Music SL
IB Theatre SL I
IB Theatre SL II
Theatre HL
IB Visual Arts SL I
IB Visual Arts SL II
IB Visual Arts HL

Core

The IBCP Core

CP candidates must complete the IBCP core which consists of:

Personal and Professional Skills (PPS I & II): Formerly known as Approaches to Learning (ATL). This course aims to develop responsibility, practical problem-solving, good intellectual habits, ethical understanding, perseverance, resilience, an appreciation of identity and perspective and an understanding of the complexity of the modern world. Emphasis is placed on the development of skills needed to successfully navigate higher education, the workplace and society.
Aims of PPS

Through PPS, students develop:

  • Good intellectual habits
  • Practical problem-solving skills
  • Self-awareness and an appreciation of identity, individual strengths and individual limitations
  • An appreciation of ethical issues relating to his or her personal, social and work experience
  • An awareness of his/her own perspectives as one of many perspectives, and one that has been shaped by contingent cultural factors
  • Intercultural awareness
  • The skill of communicating clearly and coherently
  • Personal and interpersonal skills for the workplace and beyond
  • The skills of reflection and critical thinking in personal, social and professional situations
  • An understanding that many questions, issues or problems do not always have simple right or wrong answers.

PPS is…

  • A course that meets junior & senior year and supports other elements of the IBCP Core, particularly the Service Learning experience, Language Development, and the Reflective Project.
  • Internally assessed

Service Learning, formerly known as Community and Service (C&S), is the practical application of knowledge and skills toward meeting an identified community need. Through service, students develop and apply personal and social skills in real-life situations involving decision-making, problem-solving, initiative, responsibility and accountability for their actions.
  • Students should devote a minimum of 50 hours (in and out of class).
  • Student must complete Service Learning Portfolio
  • Internally assessed

The Reflective Project (RP) is an extended piece of reflective work that can be submitted in a variety of formats. It emphasizes the ethical dilemma associated with a particular issue drawn from the student’s separately awarded/certified career-related studies. The reflective project will be submitted at the end of the 12th grade and will be an opportunity for the students to draw together the various strands of their studies.
  • It can be submitted in any of the IB working languages (English, French or Spanish).
  • Students should devote a minimum of 50 hours (in and out of class).
  • Two options for student to complete Reflective Project:
    Option 1

    A written essay (maximum 3000 words) plus reflection (maximum 1000 words) — Reflections on planning and progress form.

    Option 2

    A written essay (1500-2000 words) accompanied by an additional format (film, oral presentation, interview, play or display) plus reflections (maximum 1000 words) — Reflections on planning and progress form.
    Additional Formats and Maximum Lengths
    Format Maximum length
    Essay/dialogue/short play 3,000 Words
    Short film 10 minutes in length accompanied by a 750-word written report
    Radio play/interview 10 minutes in length accompanied by a 1,500 word written report
    Web page 5 single images accompanied by 2,500 words of written material
    Microsoft PowerPoint presentation 10 single slides accompanied by a 1,500 word written report
    Storyboard/photographic presentation 15 single images accompanied by a 1,500 word written report

Language Development ensures that all CP students have access and exposure to a second language. The opportunity to learn a second language is a central tenet of an IB education and increases students’ understanding of the wider world. Students are encouraged to begin or extend the study of an additional language that suits their needs, backgrounds and contexts. It develops students’ oral, visual and written linguistic and communicative abilities.

Language Development Requirements
  • Language development is a crucial role of an IB education; therefore, all IBCP students are required to undertake language development in which they need t to improve their language proficiency in a target language other than their best/mother tongue language. Students have five options to complete the language development component of the core.
    Language Development Options
    Option 1: Student studying Spanish, French, or Chinese Language B at either SL or HL wishes to study Spanish, French or Chinese for his LD Option 2: Student whose best language is Spanish/French or other language, and would benefit from the further development of English Option 3: On-line course will be offered for a student who wants to do her/his LD online due to time constraints Option 4: WHS own LD course of its IBCP students Option 5: Self-study course
    Language B teacher will provide an extension course. Teacher B will assign a 6th topic (DP course is comprised of 5 topics) and IBCP student satisfactory completes this 6th topic. A language teacher will provide an extension English course. The extension course comprises of a suitable topics & student satisfactory completes the extension course. The student and/or Language teacher find a suitable online Language course. The teacher regularly checks on the student progress & the student satisfactorily completes the on-line course The Language teacher will design a suitable LD course. TThe teacher delivers the LD course & student completes the LD course. The language teacher provides or checks the suitability of the intended self-study course. The student’s progress is monitored by the LD teacher & the student satisfactorily completes the LD self-study course.

  • A minimum of 50 hours is expected to be devoted to language development. This requirement is outside of the foreign language course. Although language courses are not required for the IBCP programme, they are strongly encouraged to compliment language development and college-readiness.
  • Students are require to complete an electronic language development portfolio (due in March, senior year)

Language Portfolio (LP)

The language portfolio enables students to reflect on their learning and chart their progress in developing language skills and intercultural experiences. The language portfolio is a private document for the student to reflect on their learning.

Components of the LD Portfolio
Section 1: Profile

Students complete a self-assessment of what they know in the target language and what they want to accomplish during the course of their LD. The following must be incorporated into their LD Portfolio for this section:

  • Self-Assessment of Language Proficiency
  • Language & Culture Questionnaire
  • Language Development Goals
  • Self-Assessment of Language Proficiency
Section 2: Experiences

In this section, students compile a journal of reflections on the work completed. Each student must include how he/she has developed through the language development experience (personally, professionally, and academically). Student must include the following and will be checked periodically, on-going both years 1 and 2):
and 2):

  • Monthly journal entries of experiences Reflection (these can be in the form of video recordings, audio recordings, letter, comic strips, collages, blogs, etc.)
  • Language Development Progress Form must be completed with LD mentor
  • Concluding Reflections
Section 3: Evidence

In this section, the student includes evidence to support how his/her skills have developed throughout the language development experience. Some examples of evidence might be: class projects, class assignments, certificates of language completion activities outside of schools such as Language Club participation, letters of acknowledgement, audio files, etc. Talk to the IBCP coordinator for more information regarding this section
g this section

  • Examples/Samples (Due periodically, on-going throughout Years 1 and 2)

IBCP Hexagon GroupsCP candidate students, in grades 11th and 12th must enroll in at least two DP courses.
The courses can be studied at high level (HL) or standard level (SL). The courses can be chosen from any hexagon group and can even come from the same group should the student want to specialize in a particular field of study.

The IBCP and the International Dimension

The core builds on the international dimensions experienced by IBCP students, particularly when studying the Diploma Programme courses. IBCP students are encouraged to view aspects of their studies in a broad, global context. They are challenged to become internationally minded and culturally aware. IBCP students should be reminded, however, that often it is just as important to look closer to home. Working with people from different social and cultural backgrounds in the local context can do as much to foster international-mindedness and mutual understanding as large international projects.

CP Assessments and Fees

Mandatory Fees for IBCP Students:

  • One-time IB registration fee
  • A minimum of two IB Exams-SL or HL
  • 2015 - 2016 IB and AP Exam: Policy The following WCSD policy will be applied to all students registered in an IB course. ALL requirements must be met before the IB designation is awarded and recorded on your transcript. Students register for IB courses during regular high school pre-registration each fall.
    • All WCSD students enrolled in an IB and AP course are required to take the exam in that course per Administrative Regulation 6501; therefore, students registered in IB classes will be automatically registered for the course exam unless direct communication has been made to the IBDP and AP Coordinator.
      • Students must be registered for ALL IB exams before the first IB deadline of NOVEMBER 14. Students making changes to their IB registration (dropping a class, changing courses, adding courses, or changing EE subjects) after this deadline will pay an IB amendment fee. Prices increase further after November 14, January 14 and April 14.
      • Students dropping an IB course after the November 14 deadline will not receive a refund for their IB registration fee. Students dropping an IB exam after January 14 will not receive a refund for that exam

    • Students wishing to maintain the IB designation on their transcripts, and obtain the IB weighting of the course must complete all components required by IB (including all IA’s, exams, orals, presentations, labs, etc.).

  • CP Candidate Student Fees

    2015-2016 Fee USD
    Candidate Registration Fee $164.00
    Candidate Subject Fee (DP Exam) $113.00
    An additional late fee will be incurred for a DP subject registration, reflective project registration or amendment to a subject, level of language after the first registration deadline. The late fee increases again after the second deadline.
    • Late fees will be assessed at $5 per 30 days late. To avoid this fee, complete the Payment Schedule fee form and submit to Mrs. Fine.
    • REDUCED FEES: If students qualify, we highly suggest that students apply for the Free and Reduced Lunch (FRL) Programme, for this will reduce exam fees tremendously. Students qualifying for FRL pay $15 per IB exam (this amount changes yearly according to the State of Nevada) IB registration fees are not reduced.

    • Fee amounts change yearly.
    • All fees must be paid by check, cash, or money order to the bookkeeper in the main office, or you can pay online with a credit card (includes a small processing fee) at www.woostercolts.com and then on the right hand side of the page click on “Shop the Tack Shack!,” login and then click on testing fees.(
    • The testing coordinator will visit classes to register students for both IB and AP exams. A copy of this registration will be sent home. Please keep this for your records.
    • We will send out statements at least three times in the year, but it is your responsibility to make sure all fees are paid. Please contact the bookkeeper to check payment of fees, 321-3160, and extension 37010.
    • If at any time your child’s registration changes, make sure you inform the testing coordinator (not the teacher, not the counselor) that you will not be taking the exam (or that you want to add an exam). If you do not communicate with the testing coordinator before the deadlines, then you will be held responsible for all fees.

  • IB testing and Exam Calendar
  • CTE testing and Exam Calendar

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